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News Briefs for April 22, 2017

New Study Finds Unborn Babies Likely Feel Pain in the First Trimester

A study published in the Journal Cell on 23 March 2017 reveals that the nervous system of embryos and fetuses may be greatly more developed than was previously believed.         Entitled “Tridimensional Visualization and Analysis of Early Human Development” the study shows that unborn babies in the first trimester have “adult-like” patterns of nerves. Researchers “combined whole-mount immunostaining, 3DISCO clearing, and light-sheet imaging to start building a 3D cellular map” and found that “the adult-like pattern of skin innervation is established before the end of the first trimester, showing important intra- and inter-individual variations in nerve branches.” The implication is that babies feel pain much earlier than first thought. The prevailing assumption that babies don’t feel pain in the first trimester will have to be re-examined. There is increasing evidence that unborn babies can feel pain much earlier than 20 weeks — possibly as early as five weeks. Some evidence exists to show that fetal pain may be even worse in the first trimester, due to the uneven maturation of fetal neurophysiology, reports LiveNews.com.

Smuggling Cartels Big Threat to U.S.

Smuggling cartels are now a major threat to the fabric of American society, Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly declared Tuesday, saying the international crime syndicates have shown an incredible ability to sneak drugs and people —potentially terrorists and dirty bombs — into the U.S. Mr. Kelly, a former Marine Corps general who is three months into his tenure as secretary, said among all the other dangers facing Americans, the threat from the cartels, known in the security world as “transnational criminal organizations” is what keeps him up at night. He said the Trump administration has already notched some victories over the criminal networks, including cutting the level of illegal immigration across the southwestern border by a staggering 70 percent. But he said the quantity of drugs has increased and that the smuggling cartels share ties with the terrorist networks that the U.S. is fighting overseas.

Congress Grappling with Shutdown Threat

Lawmakers return to session next week with just four days to fund the government and avert a shutdown. The deadline is April 28. The dynamics are different this time, compared with the 2013 meltdown. There’s a Republican House and Senate. This is the first government funding go-round with President Trump occupying the White House. No one is quite sure how the Trump administration will handle the negotiations or what are their untouchable requests. But there’s not a lot of time to figure this out. Some Republicans fret that House GOP leaders burned way too much time trying to rescue their failed health care bill. The White House said Thursday that it wants to see money for President Trump’s border wall included in the spending bill Congress must pass next week — a demand Democrats said sours negotiations and makes a government shutdown more likely.

Proposed Budget Cuts in Foreign Aid Worry U.N.

President Trump’s pledge to cut U.S. foreign aid loomed large over meetings the United Nations’ refugee chief held with economic development officials Friday. “I’m worried about possible reductions,” Filippo Grandi, the U.N.’s high commissioner for refugees, told USA TODAY. “I’ll have to cut back programs that help millions of people,” said Grandi, who is responsible for serving people fleeing conflicts in places like Syria, Yemen, South Sudan and North Africa. Trump’s proposed budget would slash foreign aid by 37%. Critics, such as Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., have said that would hurt America’s image as the world’s foremost provider to the neediest people. Security concerns are legitimate, but the reality is that the number of terrorist acts committed by people posing as refugees is low, Grandi said. Far more terrorist acts were committed by second- and third-generation immigrants, which points to a different kind of threat, he said. “It means that someone was not integrated properly,” he said. That’s less of a problem in the U.S. and Canada than it is in Europe, Grandi said.

Justice Department Threatens Sanctuary Cities

The Trump administration intensified its threats to crack down on so-called sanctuary cities that refuse to comply with federal immigration authorities, warning nine jurisdictions Friday that they may lose coveted law enforcement grant money unless they document cooperation. It sent letters to officials in California and major cities including New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and New Orleans. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has warned that the administration will punish communities that refuse to cooperate with efforts to find and deport immigrants in the country illegally. But some of the localities remained defiant, despite risking the loss of funds that police agencies use to pay for everything from body cameras to bulletproof vests. “We’re not going to cave to these threats,” Milwaukee County Supervisor Marina Dimitrijevic said, promising a legal fight if the money is pulled.

Scientists March in D.C. to Protest Trump Policies

Crowds of people are marching Saturday in the United States and around the world in support of science and evidence-based research in a protest fueled by opposition to President Donald Trump’s environmental and energy policies. Besides the main march in Washington, organizers said more than 600 “satellite” marches were due to take place globally in a protest timed to coincide with Earth Day. The march has been billed by its organizers as political but nonpartisan. The event’s website describes it as “the first step of a global movement to defend the vital role science plays in our health, safety, economies and governments.” U.S. scientists said they fear Trump’s proposed budget cuts would have a major impact on research and science-based policy as well as undermine the importance of science in society and limit future innovation.

Increasing Intolerance for Free Speech on College Campuses

There has been an inreasing intolerance for the exchange of ideas at American colleges and universities. In recent months, battles over free speech on campuses have descended into violence across the nation, reports CNN. Free speech came to fisticuffs before alt-right white nationalist Richard Spencer could even begin his speech at Auburn University. The University of California, Berkeley, erupted into near-riots in February during protests against right-winger Milo Yiannopoulos and again last week over President Donald Trump. When eugenicist Charles Murray spoke last month at Middlebury College in Vermont, protesters got so rowdy that a professor accompanying him was injured. Students and faculty are stifling free speech, especially if it involves conservative causes, CNN notes. More and more American universities are avoiding controversial speech altogether by banning polarizing speakers. On Wednesday Berkeley said it would seek to cancel next week’s scheduled speech by right-wing pundit Ann Coulter, citing safety concerns. And students say the middle ground on campuses is in danger of becoming quicksand, a place where neither side dares tread.

ANTIFA is Becoming the New Face of the Alt-Left

In the recent riots at Berkley and some other college campuses, the violence seems to be largely initiated and conducted by people in black clothes, hoodies, or masks. From many reports, these people are from a new organization called ANTIFA, which stands for anti-fascism. They are reportedly funded by billionaire George Soros and have communistic, or at least radical socialism. The believe that President Trump, conservatives in general, and Christians in particular, are fascists, which is far from the truth – except for the alt-right. Are they becoming the new face of liberals and the Democratic Party? Let’s hope not, because if you don’t agree with them, you are immediately shouted down as a racist, bigot, or fascist. So much for tolerance and free speech.

Race, Not Terrorism, Motive for Fresno Killings

Police say race is what drove a homeless African-American man in Fresno to shoot and kill three white men on Tuesday – bringing his homicide total to four since last week. “We don’t believe it’s a terrorist act,” Police Chief Jerry Dyer told reporters about the Tuesday rampage led by suspect Kori Ali Muhammad. “We believe it’s a hate crime. Dyer said the incident ended with Muhammad, 39, shouting “Allahu Akbar” – Arabic for “God is great” – as police took him down to the ground. Muhammad sought to kill as many white people as possible, Dyer said. The shootings were random, he added. “This is solely based on race,” he said.

Millennials Vastly Different that Previous Generations

“Today’s young adults look different from prior generations in almost every regard: how much education they have, their work experiences, when they start a family, and even who they live with while growing up,” says a report from the Census Bureau released Wednesday. It found they increasingly live at home and delay starting a family. According to the report, that trend reflects a wider shift in attitudes about the importance of work and education over family. For example, more than half of all Americans think marriage and children are not important steps in becoming an adult, while “more than 9 in 10 Americans believe that finishing school and being gainfully employed are important milestones of adulthood.” The Census Bureau looked at four common milestones of adulthood: Getting married, having kids, getting a job and living on your own. The report found that the percentage of Americans achieving all four of those milestones by age 34 dropped from 45% in 1975 to 24% in 2016.

Young adults are increasingly putting off children and marriage. Being a “single worker” is now the second most common lifestyle scenario by 2016, a rise from 6% to 23%. The report also found young women are pulling ahead in employment and wages, while those numbers on are the decline for young men. In 1975, 25% of men between 25 and 34 had incomes of less than $30,000 (adjusted for inflation) per year. By 2016, it was 41%. The number of young women ages 25 to 34 in the workforce jumped more than 40% between 1975 and 2016. Those young women saw their median income rise from $23,000 to $29,000 in the same time period, although it remains $11,000 lower than young men. Between 1975 and 2016, the number of young female “homemakers” dropped from 43% to 14%.1 in 3 young Americans lives with a parent or parents. Of those, 1 in 4 do not work or go to school. In 1975, far more young adults lived with a spouse than a parent. By 2016, more young adults lived with their parents than a husband or wife. 41% of young families had a student debt in 2013, up from 17% in 1989 and the amount owed on those loans has almost tripled.

Economic News

Existing home sales rose 4.4 percent in March to a higher-than-expected annualized rate of 5.71 million. This is the best rate since February 2007. Single-family sales were up 4.3 percent to a 5.08 million rate and condo sales were up 5.0 percent to a 630,000 rate. Year-on-year sales increases also were higher, up 5.9 percent, at 6.1 percent for single-family homes and 5.0 percent for condos. The median price of the homes sold rose 3.6 percent over February to $236,400 for a year-on-year increase of 6.8 percent. The lack of supply and heated sales pace are reflected in the number of days the homes were on the market, which were down to 34 days from 45 in the prior month and 47 days a year ago.

Retail sales declined in February and March, according the Commerce Department Tuesday. Shoppers haven’t been this stingy since early 2015, and it’s likely to hurt the economy. The U.S. is on track for very sluggish 0.5% growth in the first three months this year, according to the latest estimates from Macroeconomic Advisers and the Atlanta Federal Reserve. About 70% of the American economy comes from consumer purchases.

Out of the nearly 11.1 million undocumented immigrants estimated to be living in the U.S., Pew Research projected that there were about 8 million in the workforce in 2014. About 3.4 million, of those workers paid Social Security taxes, according to 2014 estimates from the Social Security administration. Unauthorized immigrant workers and their employers contributed $13 billion in payroll taxes in 2010, the most current estimate. Judges tend to look more favorably upon illegal immigrants who have a history of filing and paying their taxes.

Venezuela

Venezuelan authorities seized the General Motors plant there, the company confirmed late Wednesday, in a move that broadens the international implications of the country’s political and economic decomposition. The fate of other automotive plants in Venezuela was not immediately clear. The development puts an abrupt end to GM’s operations in the country, which the world’s third largest automaker described as an “illegal judicial seizure of its assets.” It also comes as the South American nation experiences intense public protests against the government of President Nicolas Maduro. Three people were killed late Wednesday as tens of thousands of Venezuelans took the streets to demand fresh presidential elections and the release of jailed opposition politicians. The country has high crime and inflation rates and there are shortages of many basic goods and services. It is oil-rich but cash-poor. The troubled Venezuelan economy has dragged down the auto industry for several years, as tanking sales and abysmal currency exchange rates have undermined earnings reports. After weeks of violent protests that left at least 22 people dead, Venezuelans will take to the streets Saturday dressed in white to pay tribute to those killed in anti-government demonstrations this month.

United Kingdom

Members of the British Parliament have approved Prime Minister Theresa May’s plan to hold an early general election on June 8. May made a unexpected announcement Tuesday that she would seek a “snap” election less than halfway through her government’s five-year term, with the aim of gaining a stronger mandate for the country’s historic withdrawal from the European Union. After debating the motion put forward by May in Parliament, 522 of the 650 sitting MPs voted in favor of the June 8 election, easily passing the threshold of two-thirds needed to approve the plan. The announcement marked a U-turn for May, who had repeatedly said she would not seek an early vote. The snap vote is the latest twist in a turbulent year in British politics, which was plunged into turmoil when the country unexpectedly voted to leave the European Union last year. The hotly contested “Brexit” referendum ended with the resignation of then-Prime Minister David Cameron.

North Korea

North Korea’s nuclear arsenal has expanded to 30 warheads and will grow further as Pyongyang produces increased quantities of weapons-grade uranium and plutonium, according to estimates by the Institute for Science and International Security in Washington, D.C. In just three years, the North’s unpredictable leader, Kim Jong-un, will control sufficient fissile material to double that arsenal to as many as 60 weapons, the Institute says. To underscore this alarming increase, the U.S. estimated that North Korea owned just one or two nuclear weapons in 1999 and would have 10 or more by 2020, according to a secret Defense Intelligence Agency report obtained by The Washington Times. “The bottom line is that North Korea has an improving nuclear weapons arsenal,” said David Albright, founder and director of the Institute. The numbers show that North Korea is becoming a true nuclear power with the ability to hit its neighbors and, one day, the U.S.

Iran

Iran is cheating on its historical deal with the U.S. by secretly conducting research into nuclear weapons components such as bomb triggers and enriched uranium, the main Iranian opposition group said Friday. The regime is doing engineering and weaponization testing at a walled military complex south of Tehran, a location which Iran has declared off-limits to inspectors, said the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) and its main operational arm, the People’s Mujaheddin of Iran. “This is the site that has been kept secret,” said Alireza Jafrazadeh, NCRI’s Washington office deputy director. “There is secret research to manufacture the bomb and basically cover up the real activities of the Iranian regime.” The 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), negotiated by the Obama administration, has become a major foreign policy issue for the Trump White House as it evaluates whether to reimpose economic sanctions on Tehran. Iran has benefited with billions of dollars in freed-up funds while it pursues interventions in Iraq, Syria and Yemen against U.S. interests. Iran is failing to fulfill the “spirit” of its nuclear deal with world powers, President Donald Trump declared Thursday, setting an ominous tone for his forthcoming decision about whether to pull the U.S. out of the landmark agreement.

France

The gunman who killed a police officer and wounded two others on the Champs-Elysees in Paris was arrested in February on suspicion of plotting to kill police officers, French media reported Friday. The suspect was detained and later freed because of a lack of evidence. In 2003, the man was convicted of attempted homicide in the shootings of two police officers. On Thursday, the gunman opened fire on a police van on the famous Paris boulevard Thursday before he was shot and killed. Multiple media outlets named the gunman as Karim Cheurfi, a French national and a father of two. The Islamic State identified him by the pseudonym Abu Yusuf al-Beljiki (father of Yusuf the Belgian) through its Amaq news agency. The attack came days before the first round of voting in the French presidential election on Sunday in which terrorism has been a major issue.

Egypt

A policeman was killed and four others were wounded after the Islamic State terror group tried to attack the St. Catherine’s monastery in Sinai, Egypt this week. The attack on the Christian monastery was thwarted. ISIS gunmen reportedly opened fire from a hilltop overlooking a police checkpoint near the entrance to the monastery. They fled the scene following the shootout, but killed one officer. Johnnie Moore, founder and CEO of The KAIROS Company and human rights advocate, told The Christian Post that the attempted attack is cause for “great alarm” throughout the global Christian community. On Palm Sunday, radicals bombed two churches in Alexandria and Tanta, killing 45 Christians. They promised more attacks would follow.

Syria

Syria retains chemical weapons and has dispersed its warplanes in recent days, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said at a news conference Friday. The aircraft dispersal suggests possible concerns about further U.S. missile strikes after President Trump ordered strikes on a Syrian air base following a chemical weapons attack in a rebel-held town in Idlib province on April 4 that killed 89 people. Scientists from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons found “incontrovertible” evidence that the victims were exposed to Sarin or a Sarin-like substance after samples from 10 victims were analyzed. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention describes sarin as a human-made chemical warfare agent classified as a nerve agent. Generally odorless and tasteless, it can cause death in minutes.

Afghanistan

An Afghan official says 140 army personnel have been killed or wounded after gunmen wearing army uniforms stormed a military compound in Balkh province. The attack on a compound of the 209th Corps of the Afghan National Army killed or wounded hundreds of soldiers and other personnel. Two terrorists carried out suicide attacks and eight other attackers were killed in the battle. The attackers even shot some soldiers as they prayed in a mosque inside the base. Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid claimed responsibility for the attack in an email sent to media.

Haiti

President Trump’s immigration agency is recommending that the U.S. end temporary protections by next January for 50,000 Haitians allowed to remain in the United States following a series of natural disasters that have crippled the poverty-stricken Caribbean nation. The agency says conditions in Haiti have improved enough to end “temporary protected status” for Haitians. The Obama administration first offered temporary protection to Haitians following the devastating 2010 earthquake. The protection has been extended several times, the latest set to expire July 22. A final decision on the Haitians’ fate rests with the Department of Homeland Security.

Wildfires

Homes were destroyed and thousands have been evacuated as Florida firefighters continue to battle 91 wildfires burning across the state, officials said Friday. More than 25,000 additional acres have burned in the state since just Thursday. In Collier County, a wildfire has grown rapidly since it broke out on Thursday. Several homes have been destroyed as another 2,000 homes were evacuated on Friday. Officials say another 5,000 homes are on a voluntary evacuation order. The so-called 30th Avenue fire ignited near the Naples neighborhood of Golden Gate Estates on Thursday. It has scorched 4,800 acres and is just 10 percent contained. Authorities said as many as nine structures, several of which are homes, have been destroyed by the blaze. In Central Florida, about 800 homes were evacuated in Indian Lake Estates near Lakeland. The fire had burned about 600 acres and destroyed several structures by Friday night. Wildfires have burned at nearly 150,000 acres across Florida since January, exceeding the five-year average of acreage that is typically burned in an entire year.

Weather

Heavy rain and spring snow runoff have caused severe flooding on the Ottawa and Rigaud rivers in Quebec, Canada, prompting a state of emergency and evacuations. About 60 homes have already flooded in the town located 20 miles west of Montreal and another 150 homes are under evacuation. The majority of the homes under evacuation in the town of 7,500 are accessed by a single road that authorities said became submerged by Thursday night.

A new round of heavy rainfall triggered additional mudslides Wednesday that killed at least 14 and injured two dozen in a mountain city in Colombia. Many in the town of Manizales were still asleep when the land gave way in the early-morning hours. The country is still recovering after floods killed at least 300 in the town of Mocoa, located in southern Colombia. The city of 400,000 received a month’s worth of rain in a span of five hours, and dozens of hillsides gave way. In all, 40 to 50 mudslides were reported, destroying homes and leaving several roadways impassable.

This news brief contributed by Pastor John Jacobsen, author of a number of exciting Christian fiction novels about the End Times (see www.johnajacobsen.com).  You can contact him on Facebook or purchase his books at Amazon.com at: https://www.amazon.com/End-Beginning-John-Jacobsen-ebook/dp/B005DTO2SO

 

 

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